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March 1945

LESIONS IN THE BRAIN ASSOCIATED WITH MALARIAPATHOLOGIC STUDY ON MAN AND ON EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS

Author Affiliations

LITTLE ROCK, ARK.

From the Departments of Pathology and Anatomy, University of Arkansas School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;53(3):191-198. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300030028004
Abstract

Pathologic changes in the brain frequently are noted in patients who have died of malaria. Petechiae in the meninges and the brain tissue are probably the lesions most often observed. Gaskell and Millar1 stated that these hemorrhages resulted primarily from degeneration of the endothelial cells lining the capillaries. Other investigators have expressed the opinion that red blood cells accumulate along the injured capillary walls and hinder the exchange of nutritive materials.2 Occlusion of the cerebral capillaries by thrombi composed of parasitized erythrocytes is considered usually to be the basis for the development of the hemorrhages. Laveran3 was one of the first to claim that these hemorrhages developed from thrombi.

Cellular reactions within the brain substance and in the meninges also have been described in cases of malaria.4 Malarial nodules have been observed in the subcortical areas of the cerebrum and infrequently in the cerebellum.4 Margulis

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