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April 1945

ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC STUDY OF PREFRONTAL LOBOTOMYA STUDY OF FOCAL BRAIN INJURY

Author Affiliations

U.S.N.R.

From the Blackburn Laboratory, St. Elizabeths Hospital, Washington, D. C.

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;53(4):283-288. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300040029005
Abstract

Because of the high incidence of head wounds (and resultant cerebral damage) sustained by casualties in the war, present interest in the study of injury to the brain has become great. Clinical studies, in which the electroencephalogram was used as an indication of disturbance in cerebral physiology following cranial lesions, have been extensively reported.1 Much experimental laboratory work has been done to support and supplement these clinical data.2 Despite the general excellence of these studies, many problems remain for solution because of the deficiencies inherent in the methods employed. The most apparent defect in the clinical work is that few of the subjects were known to the investigators prior to the post-traumatic study. In the experimental work animals were used as subjects; consequently, the results were not directly applicable to the phenomenon of cerebral injury as seen in man.

The electroencephalographic work presented in this report was carried

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