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April 1945

LIPOMA OF THE BRAINREPORT OF CASES

Author Affiliations

Member of the Section on Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic; ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic.

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;53(4):299-304. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300040045007
Abstract

Lipomas of the brain, because of their extreme rarity and the fact that most of them do not cause symptoms or signs during life, are clinically unimportant tumors. Most of them are unexpectedly encountered at necropsy. Up to this time the literature, as far as we could ascertain, does not contain data on any case of lipoma of the brain which was subjected to surgical attack. The chief interest in this lesion lies in its origin, and there have been a host of speculations in this regard.1

Lipoma of the brain has been discovered in 2 cases at the Mayo Clinic. In 1 of these cases the lesion was productive of symptoms which led to surgical removal.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —A woman student aged 18 registered at the Mayo Clinic on Jan. 17, 1933, because of attacks of unconsciousness, loss of memory and powers of concentration, and

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