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June 1945

DENIAL OF BLINDNESS BY PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL DISEASE

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Department of Psychiatry and Mental Hygiene and the Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;53(6):407-417. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300060010002
Abstract

Occasional cases of denial of blindness or deafness in cases of focal cerebral disease have been reported in the French, Russian and German literature but have received hardly any attention from Anglo-Saxon authors. However, denial of blindness in cases of pathologic conditions of the brain is frequent, although overlooked by most observers. Here, 6 cases of denial of blindness will be reported, the literature reviewed and the syndrome discussed.

REVIEW OF LITERATURE  In 1896 Anton gave a verbal report of a case with bilateral softenings of the visual radiations, followed by complete blindness which the patient himself did not notice. Anton wrote two papers,1 in which he reported this case and 3 others. The first case was that of a 56 year old seamstress who was amaurotic but unaware of her blindness. She had dysphasia of the amnestic type; otherwise the results of neurologic examination were essentially normal. She

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