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July 1945

POLYCYTHEMIA AS A NEUROSURGICAL PROBLEMA REVIEW, WITH REPORTS OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and the Harrison Department of Surgical Research, University of Pennsylvania Schools of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;54(1):25-36. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300070035003
Abstract

That polycythemia should present a problem to the neurosurgeon will seem, to many, a novel idea. However, recognition of the remarkably high incidence of complications of the central nervous system associated with polycythemia will show that the possibilities are not so remote as they at first appear. In the fields of general medicine and surgery, differential diagnoses are many, as related both to similar and to dissimilar processes. In neurosurgery, not only is the field itself relatively narrow, but the actual number of differential problems is fewer. The immediate chief concern in cases of intracranial disease is whether or not the patient has an operable condition. The lesions commonly associated with this aspect of the problem include intracranial neoplasms, hemorrhage, abscess, infections, hypertensive cardiovascular disease, degenerative lesions and diseases of the eye producing papilledema. Less common are such conditions as pseudotumor,1 renal disease with uremia2 and blood dyscrasias.

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