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August 1945

DEGENERATION OF PERIPHERAL NERVES IN PERNICIOUS ANEMIA

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Department of Neurology and the Neuropathology Laboratory of the Neuropsychiatric Institute, the University Hospital and the University of Michigan Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;54(2):102-109. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300080030003
Abstract

The signs and symptoms of disease of the peripheral nerves associated with pernicious anemia and subacute combined degeneration have been noted by a number of observers, estimates of the incidence varying from 4.91 to 232 per cent. The separation of neuritic from myelitic components in a diffuse disease of the nervous system is notoriously difficult and unreliable, and for this reason the status of the peripheral nerves in this disorder has been speculative and controversial. Since peripheral nerves have a powerful regenerative capacity as compared with the insignificant recuperative powers of the central nervous system, the presence and degree of neuritic damage in pernicious anemia are important in prognosis and therapy. This report describes the pathologic changes in the peripheral nerves in 4 cases in which autopsy was performed and the results of biopsy of a peripheral nerve in an additional case.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —N.

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