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August 1945

ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM OF DOGS WITH EXPERIMENTAL SPACE-OCCUPYING INTRACRANIAL LESIONS

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

From the Department of Anatomy, University of Oregon Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;54(2):141-149. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300080069007
Abstract

The controlled reproduction in laboratory animals of pathologic conditions which produce alteration in the electroencephalogram is one approach toward an understanding of abnormal brain waves. Foerster and Altenburger1 have shown that tumor tissue itself is apparently electrically inert and that the changes observed electroencephalographically with such lesions are recorded from tissue surrounding the tumor. Hence it has seemed logical to use a noncellular material to simulate the space-occupying lesions observed clinically. The procedure of introducing foreign bodies in the brain is not new,2 and the histologic changes from foreign bodies in the brain have been reported by several workers.3 Experimental subdural and extradural hematomas in rabbits have been reported by Glaser and Sjaardema4 to cause alteration in the electroencephalogram characterized by the disappearance of normal frequencies and the appearance of slow waves mixed with rapid activity.

An understanding of the alterations in the anatomic and physiologic

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