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November 1945

BILATERAL INTRACRANIAL SECTION OF THE GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL NERVEREPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From Temple University Hospital and Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;54(5):344-347. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300110028004
Abstract

Unilateral intracranial division of the glossopharyngeal nerve is indicated in cases of glossopharyngeal tic, hypersensitive carotid sinus syndrome and malignant growths of the nasopharynx.

A case of glossopharyngeal pain was first recorded by Weisenburg,1 in 1910. Autopsy in this case disclosed a tumor of the posterior fossa involving primarily the ninth cranial nerve. In 1920 Sicard and Robineau2 recorded 3 cases of true glossopharyngeal neuralgia. They asserted that the pain was due to involvement of the ninth and tenth cranial nerves and the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion. In 1921 Harris3 introduced the term glossopharyngeal neuralgia and described 2 cases. A great deal of confusion arose at this time as to whether the glossopharyngeal nerve was motor or sensory or both. Vernet4 taught that the glossopharyngeal nerve was largely motor in function and that sensation to the pharynx and soft palate was supplied by the vagus nerve.

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