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March 1946

VASOPARALYSIS AND VASOTHROMBOSIS OF THE BRAIN IN INFANCY AND IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

From the Laboratory of Neuropathology, Cincinnati General Hospital, and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1946;55(3):216-231. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1946.02300140047002
Abstract

THE current teaching of a large number of pathologists in regard to lesions of the central nervous system might be summed up in the doctrine that in the absence of organic disease of blood vessels, such as arteriosclerosis or syphilis, the alterations in nerve tissue must be interpreted as "primary degenerative" or "toxic." The main interest in the vascular lesions of the brain has always been centered on the organic type of arterial disease. Only recently has attention been called to the importance of so-called functional, or reversible, circulatory disturbances, described as "vasoparalysis"1 and "vasothrombosis."2 It has been pointed out that a change in caliber of a blood vessel might, under certain circumstances, be as detrimental to the brain tissue as a mechanical obstruction caused by arteriosclerosis. Obviously, mere dilatation of an otherwise normal vessel is not evidence of vascular abnormality. A certain degree of congestion may be

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