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April 1946

CHANGES IN SENSORY ADAPTATION TIME AND AFTER-SENSATION WITH LESIONS OF PARIETAL LOBE

Arch NeurPsych. 1946;55(4):299-319. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1946.02300150003001
Abstract

PATHOLOGIC conditions frequently produce symptoms which are reflections of normal functions. This has been affirmed repeatedly by various authors. One of the normal functions which has thus been elicited in patients with injuries to the brain is rivalry with resultant dominance of strong over weak sensation. The process of rivalry with resultant dominance was recently demonstrated in patients with defects in the visual and cutaneous spheres.1 Visual perception, diminished in a given area owing to a lesion in the optic pathway, can be further reduced or made totally extinct when stimuli (objects) are exposed simultaneously in the normal and in the affected field of vision. This visual extinction was explained by Poppelreuter as due to inattention.2 However, a careful study of patients manifesting this phenomenon has thrown doubt on Poppelreuter's theory, for several reasons: (a) The extinction occurs in spite of the patient's attempt to concentrate on the

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