[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
February 1947

NEUROGENIC ARTHROPATHY (CHARCOT JOINT) ASSOCIATED WITH DIABETIC NEUROPATHYReport of Two Cases

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; ANN ARBOR, MICH.

From the Departments of Neurology and Surgery, Neurosurgery Section, University Hospital, and the University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Mich.

Arch NeurPsych. 1947;57(2):173-185. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1947.02300250051004
Abstract

IT is a matter of general knowledge that tabes dorsalis or syringomyelia underlies most neuropathic joints; the mechanism by which these diseases predispose afflicted persons to the development of neurogenic arthropathy (Charcot joint) is still imperfectly understood. Disease processes which afflict areas of the nervous system other than those involved in tabes dorsalis or syringomyelia offer an approach to a better understanding of the genesis of such joint disorders; for this reason, and because of the scarcity of similar observations, the following cases of Charcot joint complicating the neuropathy of diabetes mellitus are presented.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  History.—W. E., a poolroom proprietor aged 23, was admitted to University Hospital because of swelling of the left foot, of five months' duration. His occupation required him to stand about ten hours a day, and for two or three months prior to onset of the swelling he had worn

×