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December 1947

CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM IN PNEUMONIA (NONSUPPURATIVE PNEUMONIC ENCEPHALITIS)III. An Experimental Study

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

From the Division of Neurology, the University of Minnesota Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1947;58(6):653-671. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1947.02300350003001
Abstract

THE CEREBRAL complications associated with pneumonia have received but scant attention in American literature, although numerous reports are available in many of the foreign journals (Bonaba, Marcos and de Agorio1; Comby2; Bonaba, Boni and Barberouse3; de Filippi and Fernández4; Nové-Josserand and associates5; Gareiso and Sagreras6; Mollard and Dufourt7; Eschbach8; Stephan9; Comby10). Actually, such complications are not infrequent and may appear at the onset or at the height of the pneumonia or during convalescence, after the patient has become afebrile and appears well along the road to recovery. Cases often reveal a wide variability of symptoms, ranging from such generalized complaints as headache, vomiting, vertigo and lethargy to the more dramatic complications of coma, convulsions, delirium, monoplegia, hemiplegia, athetoses and psychic disturbances (Baker and Noran11). The most common picture seen is that of acute meningoencephalitis. In many instances, after a

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