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December 1947

POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD OF SURVIVAL OF PATIENTS WITH OLIGODENDROGLIOMA OF THE BRAINReport of Twenty-Five Cases

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Departments of Neurosurgery and Neuropathology of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch NeurPsych. 1947;58(6):710-715. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1947.02300350060005
Abstract

OF THE intracranial gliomas, the group described as the oligodendrogliomas has been considered relatively benign. Since these tumors infiltrate the surrounding brain, complete removal may be impossible; yet recurrent symptoms have been reported only after a lapse of three to five years. Recently, however, this point has been questioned.1 In an attempt to throw further light on the matter, we have reviewed the clinical course in 25 cases of verified oligodendrogliomas in the files of the neurosurgical laboratory of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

PRESENT INVESTIGATION  In 6 of the 25 cases in this series (24 per cent) the tumor was intraventricular, presumably arising from the walls of the ventricle. In 2 cases the tumor lay wholly within one of the lateral ventricles—in 1 case in the right and in the other in the left. The third ventricle appeared to be the original site of growth in

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