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June 1948

ROLE OF AFFERENT IMPULSES IN EXPERIMENTAL CONVULSIONS

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

From the Laboratory of Neurophysiology, Department of Physiology, University of Minnesota.

Arch NeurPsych. 1948;59(6):718-733. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1948.02300410029002
Abstract

ALTHOUGH clinical evidence on the effect of afferent impulses in either precipitating or preventing epileptic attacks has been presented since the time of Hughlings Jackson1 (for more recent studies see Holmes,2 Thomas3 and Walshe4), little experimental work has been done which throws light on the mechanisms involved. Franck5 stated that stimulation of the occipital cortex may produce convulsive activity after the motor cortex has been sensitized through a previous stimulus which induced a convulsive seizure. These impulses seem to act on the motor cortex, since extirpation of the ipsilateral motor area prevents this effect (Rosenbach and Danillo6). Franck stated also that stimulation of sensory nerves may precipitate seizures. Amantea7 observed that movements can be evoked in dogs after a receptive zone in the sensorimotor cortex has been strychninized. Furthermore, he claimed that in "hypersensitive" dogs such stimuli may produce generalized convulsions. More recently,

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