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July 1948

ANEURYSM OF TERMINAL PORTION OF ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Neurology and Neurological Surgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine, and the Illinois Neuropsychiatric Institute.

Arch NeurPsych. 1948;60(1):81-85. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1948.02310010087008
Abstract

SINCE MONIZ in 1927 introduced the use of contrast mediums for visualization of the intracranial vascular system, cerebral angiography has been most widely used in the diagnosis of intracranial aneurysms.1 It has been especially useful in cases with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and signs and symptoms which do not lead to an accurate localization, as in cases of aneurysms at some distance from the circle of Willis. We have recently had the opportunity to study such an aneurysm near the posterior extremity of the pericallosal branch of the internal carotid artery with angiograms taken before and after operation.

REPORT OF A CASE  D.A.M., a single white girl aged 19, an office worker, was admitted to the Illinois Neuropsychiatric Institute on Sept. 14, 1946, because of headaches, projectile vomiting and weakness of the left arm and leg of five days' duration.She had been subject to intermittent headaches since the age

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