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December 1948

NEUROLOGIC SEQUELAE OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

From the Department of Neurology and Neuropathology Laboratory, University Hospital, University of Michigan.

Arch NeurPsych. 1948;60(6):574-583. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1948.02310060027003
Abstract

DURING the acute stage of Rocky Mountain spotted fever the central nervous system is frequently involved. This involvement may be manifested by the clinical findings of confusion, coma, convulsions, hyperactive and pathologic reflexes, cranial nerve palsies, paraplegia and hemiplegia. The most prevalent opinion1 is that, although these neurologic changes may persist for weeks or months after the onset of the illness, they are usually only transient and ultimately subside without leaving any clinically detectable residuals. Nevertheless, there is evidence that following some acute cases there may remain permanent neurologic sequelae. It is the purpose of this paper to report the clinical and pathologic findings in a case in which disabling neurologic and psychiatric symptoms were maintained for one and one-half years after the onset of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

REPORT OF A CASE2  W. K., a 48 year old white Michigan farmer was well until Aug. 7, 1945,

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