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April 1949

PRESENILE SCLEROSIS (ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE) WITH FEATURES RESEMBLING PICK'S DISEASE

Author Affiliations

TOPEKA, KANSAS

From the Laboratory of Neuropathology, Neuropsychiatric Institute of University Hospital, University of Michigan, R. W. Waggoner, M. D., Director.

Arch NeurPsych. 1949;61(4):369-384. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1949.02310100033003
Abstract

ALTHOUGH presenile sclerosis (Alzheimer's disease) has relatively well defined clinical and pathoanatomic characteristics, there may be significant variations in both these aspects of the disease. The usual clinical course is marked by progressive intellectual deterioration and personality changes which develop in the presenium. Occasionally, however, the disease may begin in adolescence1 and manifest localizing neurologic signs,2 aphasia3 and convulsions.4 The pathoanatomic features may also vary from case to case. The usual gross change is a diffuse atrophy of the cerebral cortex, and the microscopic picture is one of depletion of the cytoarchitecture, the presence of senile plaques and neurofibrillary degeneration of the neurons. In some instances instead of diffuse atrophy, there may occur areas of focal atrophy, resembling those of Pick's disease,5 in association with otherwise typical histologic changes of presenile sclerosis. There is also considerable latitude in the relative concentration and distribution of the

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