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June 1949

LESIONS OF THE SPINAL CORD (TRANSVERSE MYELOPATHY) IN ACHONDROPLASIA

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Third Medical Division, New York University (Dr. W. S. Tillett), and the Neurological and Neurosurgical Service, Cornell University (Dr. Foster Kennedy) of Bellevue Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1949;61(6):644-662. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1949.02310120048003
Abstract

ACHONDROPLASIA is generally regarded as a disfiguring, but otherwise innocuous, condition derived from a well defined anomaly of cartilaginous development. The only clinical complication of achondroplasia generally recognized is that occasionally seen in obstetric practice, in which the disproportion between a normalsized fetus and a dwarfed pelvis may necessitate cesarean section.

In this paper we wish to call attention to the occurrence of lesions of the spinal cord in achondroplastic adults. We shall try to demonstrate the etiologic relation between the basic developmental disorder and the neurologic syndrome and shall point out means of preventing or curing this incapacitating condition.

It has been stressed in the past that achondroplasia affects chiefly the extremities and the skull, accounting for the characteristic shortness of the limbs and the peculiar shape of the skull. The achondroplastic spine has been commonly regarded as "practically normal" in size and shape except for an "exaggerated lumbar

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