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August 1949

ROLE OF REPEATED TRAUMA BY PNEUMATIC DRILL IN PRODUCTION OF AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Department of Neurology, Jefferson Medical College.

Arch NeurPsych. 1949;62(2):178-182. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1949.02310140055005
Abstract

THE ISSUE of trauma in the production or precipitation of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is difficult to assess, as it is in all nervous diseases. Experience with 2 patients in whom symptoms of the disease appeared to follow the use of a pneumatic drill raised the problem of whether repeated trauma might play a role in precipitation of the disease, and for this reason we report the cases in question.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in a 63 year old man who had worked with a pneumatic hand drill for nine months, symptoms appearing in the eighth month of its use; signs of anterior horn cell disease confined largely to the cervical portion of the spinal cord.

History.  —E. H., a 63 year old Armenian man, was admitted to the Jefferson Hospital on May 5, 1947, with the complaint of weakness and twitching of the arms. Twenty months

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