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September 1949

ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC STUDIES IN SPINAL CORD DISEASE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurological Service (Cornell University), Dr. Foster Kennedy, Director, and the Electroencephalographic Laboratory, Dept. of Psychiatry (New York University), Dr. S. Bernard Wortis, Director, Bellevue Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1949;62(3):293-303. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1949.02310150040005
Abstract

ALTHOUGH the applicability of clinical electroencephalography in intracranial lesions has been broadened by the recognition of certain rather characteristic abnormalities produced by subcortical lesions, the influence of primary spinal cord disease on the electroencephalogram has not been clearly defined. It is the prevailing opinion that spinal cord dysfunction, caused by local vascular, compressive or degenerative processes, is not reflected in the brain wave pattern. That this view may not be correct will be brought out by the results of the present study.

There is little or no information in the literature concerning the experimental or clinical relation between the electroencephalogram and pathologic processes in the spinal cord. On the other hand, studies of the effect on electrocortical activity of changes in other portions of the nervous system are in abundance. Adrian, Dusser de Barenne, McCulloch and others1 have outlined the somatosensory boundaries of the cerebral cortex by the electroencephalographic

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