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September 1949

THE SYNDROME OF SENSORIMOTOR INDUCTION IN DISTURBED EQUILIBRIUM

Arch NeurPsych. 1949;62(3):330-354. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1949.02310150077009
Abstract

THE FINDING of changes in sensory function in patients with disturbed equilibrium is of much theoretic and practical significance, opening up new aspects of neurologic research. Observations hitherto reported are, however, too few to disclose the whole clinical complex and the underlying pathologic mechanism. The broadening of the clinical concept and the establishment of a solid basis of confirmed facts are particularly required, and the following observations may serve as a contribution.

CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS 

Case 1. 

—General Clinical Picture.  —J. W., an engineer aged 29, had developed normally as a child. He had always been healthy.The present disease began nine months before his admission. He noticed that when he walked he bumped into people and objects on his right and that involuntarily he deviated to the right. A few months later he also noted great fatigue when reading, and the print seemed to swim before his eyes. He then

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