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July 1950

ISOLATED NEURITIS OF A SENSORY FILAMENT OF A PERIPHERAL NERVE TRUNK

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch NeurPsych. 1950;64(1):89-92. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310250095008

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Abstract

THE OBSERVATION to be described is of interest to the physician in general practice, to whom the sufferer appeals first. The condition is frequently misleading with respect to its localization, cause and prolonged course, all leading to erroneous therapeutic measures. Because of its comparative infrequency and the beneficial results obtained from a special method of treatment, the presentation of the subject is warranted.

The peripheral nerve trunks of the extremities, being composed of mixed motor and sensory fibers, when in a state of irritation or inflammation will give rise to both motor and sensory phenomena. This is a common observation. Isolated involvement of either motor or sensory nerve fibers is sometimes observed. The physician is familiar with motor neuritis and sensory neuritis. For example, in multiple neuritis caused by lead intoxication, motor phenomena (paralyses) are almost exclusively present and the sensory disturbances are usually absent. In syphilis multiple sensory neuritis

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