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August 1950

RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF THE CEREBELLUM

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Anatomy, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1950;64(2):196-219. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310260034002
Abstract

THIS PRELIMINARY review of the newer contributions to knowledge of the cerebellum is limited primarily to those which have appeared during the past decade. As background material, very brief mention will be made of the most significant early work, but an unwieldly paper would result if a comprehensive coverage of the many articles which have been published on the clinical and basic aspects of this subject were attempted. For more detailed information on the subject up to approximately fifteen years ago, the reader is referred to such splendid reviews as those by Ariëns Kappers, Huber and Crosby,1 Jakob2 and the Proceedings of the Association for Research in Nervous and Mental Diseases3 for 1926.

It is probably fair to say that the history of modern physiology of the cerebellum begins with Rolando,4 who, in 1809, studied decerebellectomized animals and introduced two functional concepts which are still accepted

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