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October 1950

TETRAETHYLAMMONIUM CHLORIDE IN THE TREATMENT OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Division of Neuropsychiatry (Dr. Sherman) and the Division of Medicine (Drs. Arkin and Weinberg) of Michael Reese Hospital, and the Department of Nervous and Mental Diseases (Dr. Sherman), Northwestern University Medical School.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1950;64(4):536-545. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310280048005
Abstract

OUR INTEREST in tetraethylammonium chloride was aroused quite by accident in August 1947. Tetraethylammonium chloride was used in an effort to relieve an intense causalgic state which had followed bilateral alcohol injection of the posterior tibial nerves in a case of multiple sclerosis with severe spasm of the plantar flexors of the feet. About two weeks after the beginning of therapy remarkable resolution of the long-standing paraplegia began. So dramatic was the improvement that an investigation of the possible role of tetraethylammonium chloride was considered necessary. Similarly suggestive results obtained in a second case of the disease treated shortly thereafter led us to undertake a more thorough evaluation of the drug in management of multiple sclerosis.

Further impetus was given to the continuation of the study by the report of Bell, Williams and Karnosh.1 These workers found a favorable response in 14 acute cases and unfavorable results in 8

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