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April 1951

AN ASSESSMENT OF THERAPY IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; LONDON, ENGLAND

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1951;65(4):489-501. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1951.02320040079007
Abstract

SINCE 1817, when James Parkinson1 recognized the entity of paralysis agitans among the heterogeneous collection of tremors and paralyses, the most persistent attempts have been made to treat this disease. It is instructive to review some of the methods used and the claims that have been made for them.

Parkinson himself suggested that blood be taken from the upper part of the neck, that vesications be applied to the same part and a purulent discharge obtained by use of the Sabine liniment. If that should fail, an issue should be made, and kept open, beside the vertebral column. He reasoned, on ingenious theoretical grounds, that improvement should result. Before very long this method had fallen into disrepute, and we read of Elliston2 giving carbonate of iron and of Brown-Séquard2 giving barium chloride. Both reported cures, as well as some remissions and some failures. Then Trousseau2 reported

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