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June 1951

GLUCOSE TOLERANCE IN CHRONIC SCHIZOPHRENIA AND SENILE STATES

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

From the Neuropsychiatric Service, Veterans Administration Hospital, Minneapolis, and the Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, University of Minnesota.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1951;65(6):717-723. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1951.02320060060007
Abstract

ABNORMAL glucose tolerance, characterized by a reduction of the tolerance to ingested sugar, has been reported in various mental disorders by a number of investigators. Diabetic-like blood sugar curves of a sustained type have been found in cases of schizophrenia, indicating a biochemical disturbance of the carbohydrate metabolism in this condition. Meduna and Vaichulis1 reported diabetic-like reaction to the Exton-Rose glucose tolerance test in about 60 per cent of unselected schizophrenic patients. In a previous study, Meduna, Gerty and Urse2 demonstrated a delay in the return of the blood sugar to a normal level following infusion of a dextrose solution in all of their 20 untreated schizophrenic patients. They concluded that a disturbance of the carbohydrate metabolism existed, as indicated by a delayed utilization of blood sugar, and postulated that this disturbance might be one of the etiologic factors in schizophrenia. However, Meduna, Braceland and Vaichulis3 reported

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