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December 1951

ELECTRIC SHOCK THERAPY IN A CASE OF MYASTHENIA GRAVIS COMPLICATED BY A SCHIZOPHRENIC PSYCHOSIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurological Institute of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center; Assistant Resident Neurologist, Dr. Williams; Assistant Attending Neurologist, Dr. Silbermann.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1951;66(6):783-786. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1951.02320120116012
Abstract

MYASTHENIA gravis is a rather uncommon entity. There were 25 admissions with myasthenia gravis in a total of 28,000 general admissions to the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in 1948. Eaton,1 in 1947, reported an incidence of four cases of myasthenia gravis per 10,000 admissions to the Mayo Clinic.

The combination of myasthenia gravis and psychosis is a rare occurrence. Very few cases have been reported in which a psychosis has been associated with myasthenia gravis. Göni,2 in his exhaustive study of the literature, did not report any cases of myasthenia complicated by psychotic episodes. In 1939 Collins3 described a case of schizophrenia in a patient with myasthenia gravis. In 1945 Delgado and Sal y Rosas4 reported a case of myasthenia gravis with psychosis. The authors did not classify the psychosis, but simply mentioned symptoms of paranoid ideas, visual and auditory hallucinations, and periods of disorientation and confusion.

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