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January 1952

CHANGES IN PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY OF SERUM AND URINE AFTER SHOCK THERAPY

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Laboratory of Clinical Physiology, McLean Hospital, Waverley, Mass., and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1952;67(1):59-63. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1952.02320130065005
Abstract

THE WORK of Herlant and Timiras1 showed that the alkaline phosphatase activity of various tissues in animals was increased after stress. In addition, Moyson2 stated the belief that trauma caused an increase in phosphatase activity in the blood in man as a consequence of stimulation of the adrenal cortex. It was considered desirable, therefore, to study phosphatase activities in the serum of patients with mental disease before and after treatment.

MATERIAL AND METHODS  Thirty-nine patients, ranging in age from 14 to 79 years, were studied; 13 were men. The diagnoses were distributed as follows: schizophrenia, 13 patients; manic-depressive psychosis (manic phase), 4; manic-depressive psychosis (depressed phase), 9; involutional psychosis, 6, and severe neurosis, 7. No patients with skeletal injuries were included.Blood was taken in all instances before any treatment was given; in addition, blood was taken in 27 instances approximately one week after the last ambulatory insulin

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