[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
March 1952

RELATIVE EFFECTS OF OCCIPITAL AND PERIPHERAL BLINDNESS UPON INTELLECTUAL FUNCTIONS

Author Affiliations

NEWINGTON, CONN.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1952;67(3):310-314. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1952.02320150043003
Abstract

THE PROBLEM  LASHLEY1 has shown that the occipital cortex of the rat possesses important extravisual functions in the learning of the maze. One would expect that in man this cortical area would likewise have significant cortical functions, independent of its role as the primary visual center. Particularly in the intellectual areas should the contributions of the occipital cortex be evident. In our well-standardized intelligence tests we have effective instruments for measuring the extent of these contributions in the normal human subject. However, either reliable test information prior to brain injury has not been available or the disturbance has been so severe that extrapolation to normal intellectual function has not been possible.Even if desirable cases were available, the question arises whether the intelligence tests in ordinary use in clinical work are sensitive enough to measure any loss in intellectual capacity resulting from damage to the occipital cortex. A test

×