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June 1952

ABSENCE OF CLINICAL EVIDENCE OF DESTRUCTIVE LESIONS OF THE SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM IN ACUTE ANTERIOR POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Nervous and Mental Diseases, Northwestern University Medical School.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1952;67(6):725-736. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1952.02320180002001
Abstract

THERE is need for clarification of the reports upon disturbances in functions of the sympathetic nervous system in acute anterior poliomyelitis. Often coupled with reference to the work of others, and with reports of authors themselves upon pathologic changes in the intermediolateral column of cells and in the ganglia of the sympathetic chain, is a description of some change in function of the sympathetic nervous system, leading to the assumption that the dysfunction noted is related to the pathologic changes described. For the most part, evidence of such dysfunction has consisted of some one sign or symptom, such as excessive sweating, increased electrical skin resistance in the axillae, or temporary retention of urine during the acute stage. At times more comprehensive studies have been made, including determinations of skin temperature and oscillometry, during the acute stage, as well as late after the onset of the disease.1

Far from demonstrating

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