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August 1952

MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE EPISODES IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSISA Preliminary Report

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Neurological Service, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, Drs. I. S. Wechsler and M. Bender, successive Chiefs.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1952;68(2):180-198. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1952.02320200018004
Abstract

THE PROBLEM  STUDIES made several years ago by Brickner and Franklin1 and Franklin and Brickner2 showed that some of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis could be reduced or abolished promptly with vasodilating drugs. Constrictions seen in retinal arterioles often appeared to be associated with scotomas; both constrictions and scotomas were affected by the drugs. From these and certain related observations the theory was evolved that at least some of the lesions are the consequence of vasospasm,3 with or without associated thrombosis (Putnam and others4). Photographs of constrictions will appear in another communication.5Franklin and I were unable at that time to apply these findings in such a way as to make them of definite therapeutic use. Others have since made efforts to do so. Previous efforts had been made to use vasodilation therapeutically, for other reasons. However, even though some of the results have been

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