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October 1952

ARCHITECTONIC DISTRIBUTION OF ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE IN THE FRONTAL ISOCORTEX OF PSYCHOTIC AND NONPSYCHOTIC PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; NEW YORK; PORTLAND, ORE.

From the McLean Hospital Research Laboratory, Waverley, Mass.; the Boston Psychopathic Hospital; the Lahey Clinic Neurosurgical Service, and the Departments of Neuropathology and Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1952;68(4):425-443. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1952.02320220002001
Abstract

WHETHER study of the physics and chemistry of the brain can contribute importantly to fuller understanding of the nature of mental illness is a question to which present knowledge furnishes no clear answer. With certain simple exceptions, translations are not now possible between verifiable assertions in physical language concerning that structure of spatiotemporal events which is the brain in action and those in psychological language that describe behavior and, within the framework of psychodynamics, postulate its determinants. Both systems of assertions refer to aspects of single sets of occurrences, and, a priori, there is no reason for devaluation or exclusion of either as a means toward greater understanding of the phenomena of psychiatry.

Classic neuropathology has sought unavailingly for a characteristic brain "lesion" in the major psychoses. Innumerable claims to the contrary, it must be acknowledged that at the level of histopathology and cytopathology no unique, characteristic, or consistent anatomical

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