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December 1952

SLEEP PARALYSIS SUCCESSFULLY TREATED WITH INSULIN HYPOGLYCEMIA

Author Affiliations

OAKLAND, CALIF.

From the Department of Medicine, Permanente Foundation Hospital.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1952;68(6):835-841. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1952.02320240110012
Abstract

SLEEP paralysis is a disturbance of the process of awakening from sleep in which the conscious sensory phase is followed by a prolonged delay in the ability to move, during which the voluntary muscles are temporarily paralyzed. It is an entity which is not often encountered1 and for which heretofore there has been no treatment beyond reassurance. For these reasons, the following case report and record of successful treatment with mild insulin hypoglycemia are submitted. This treatment also has implications for a therapeutic approach to other disorders of possible hypothalamic origin.

METHOD OF TREATMENT  The patient, who was in an overnight fasting state, was given regular insulin intramuscularly at the medical clinic office. The dose was so adjusted as to produce a mild hypoglycemic reaction, as shown by mild sweating, within 1 to 1¼ hours. This reaction was at once counteracted by the ingestion of 12 oz. (360 cc.)

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