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May 1953

CARDIOVASCULAR CHANGES ASSOCIATED WITH ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY IN MAN

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY

From the Departments of Psychiatry and Physiology, State University of Iowa College of Medicine.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1953;69(5):601-608. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1953.02320290053006
Abstract

THE DEVELOPMENT of an electromagnetic blood-flow meter by Richardson and associates1 enabled the accurate direct, continuous recording of blood flow in the carotid artery of animals. This method was employed in a recent study by Brown and others2 in which dogs were subjected to electroconvulsive shock and, more recently, in a study of the cardiovascular response of monkeys undergoing electroconvulsive shock.3 In both studies the blood pressure also was measured directly in the arteries of the animals. In the two series of experiments on dogs and monkeys, it was found that the pattern of blood flow response following the onset of electroconvulsive shock duplicated the pattern of blood pressure response, as to both time and direction of change. It was suggested in the study on monkeys that this finding had important implications for the interpretation of certain responses observed in human subjects receiving electroconvulsive therapy. At present

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