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June 1953

ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC FINDINGS ASSOCIATED WITH SUBDURAL HEMATOMAReview of Forty-Five Cases

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section of Physiology (Mr. Bickford) and the Section of Neurologic Surgery (Dr. Svien), Mayo Clinic.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1953;69(6):743-755. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1953.02320300076009
Abstract

IN PAST years the literature on subdural hematoma has been steadily increasing. Since Walter's1 original description of a "silent area" over an extradural hematoma as evidenced in the electroencephalogram, and the description, by Jasper and co-workers,2 of a "silent area" on the side of a subdural hematoma, several series of cases of subdural hematoma have been reviewed by various authors. These reviews have resulted in varied pictures. This discrepancy may be due to two factors: One is a matter of terminology. Both Walter and Jasper and co-workers employed the term "silent area," but Walter described under this term a delta focus, whereas Jasper and co-workers employed it for a marked lowering of the amplitude. A second factor is the small number of cases in most of the series. Glaser and Sjaardema3 reported 3 cases; Cohn and co-workers,4 6 cases; Marsh and co-workers,5 13 cases; Smith

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