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June 1953

MARCH OF PILOERECTION AS A CONVULSIVE EQUIVALENT

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS

From the Section of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1953;69(6):766-768. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1953.02320300099012
Abstract

THE PRINCIPAL evidence that the human cortex exercises a control over visceral functions is derived from cases presenting destructive lesions of cortical efferent tracts.1 Piloerection, among other autonomic responses, may be willed, directly or indirectly, an observation also suggesting that the cortex is somehow involved.2 Experimentally, piloerection has been obtained by stimulating the cingulate cortex of the monkey3; a path descending from the cingulum through the tegmentum may be presumed to convey the activity to lower autonomic centers (Brown and Sherrington4; Walker5).

Féré6 reported a case of localized piloerection on the face, sometimes associated with unilateral focal convulsion. This phenomenon occurred in a patient who also had attacks of migraine and of a generalized seizure. Generalized piloerection associated with convulsion was described in a case by Féré7 and in other cases by Hutchinson.8 Bucy and Pribram9 noted focal sweating as one

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