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September 1953

EFFECTS OF ISOTONIC INTRAVENOUS SOLUTIONS ON NORMAL AND INCREASED INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE

Author Affiliations

With the Technical Assistance of Roman J. Halla, B.S. WASHINGTON, D. C.

From the Department of Neurophysiology, Army Medical Service Graduate School, Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1953;70(3):350-360. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1953.02320330075007
Abstract

THE PRESSURE of the cerebrospinal fluid is dependent upon the volumes of blood, cerebrospinal fluid, extracellular fluid, and intracellular fluid within the cranial cavity. The alteration in cerebrospinal fluid pressure resulting from expansion of the extracellular fluid volume, as opposed to an expansion of the intracellular fluid volume, is of theoretical interest and may be of practical importance in the management of patients with increased intracranial pressure. The relative volumes of the extracellular and intracellular fluids can be experimentally changed by taking advantage of the different volumes of distribution of two isotonic solutions, 0.9% saline and 5% dextrose in water, following intravenous administration. The rapid intravenous administration of either solution causes an initial expansion of the plasma volume. The further distribution of 0.9% saline is essentially limited to the extracellular fluid volume, while 5% dextrose in water is distributed to both the extracellular and the intracellular fluid volume. Thus, saline

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