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November 1953

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE PROGNOSIS IN ACUTE FOCAL CEREBROVASCULAR LESIONS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Sections of Neurology and Psychiatry, the Mayo Clinic.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1953;70(5):558-562. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1953.02320350010002
Abstract

THE TECHNIQUE that utilizes nitrous oxide for the measurement of cerebral blood flow has added much to the knowledge of cerebrovascular physiology. Unfortunately, the new laboratory methods do not give information concerning circulatory differences among diseased, borderline, and normal regions of the brain. The present study has been undertaken in order to correlate some of these new data with clinical experience and to determine some of the clinical elements that influence the prognosis in acute focal cerebrovascular disease.

SCOPE OF STUDY  Clinical observations concerning 223 patients encountered at the Mayo Clinic during a period of two years form the basis of this report. The method for making and recording these observations has been described previously.1 Cerebral infarction with or without thrombosis was present in 184 (82.5%) of these patients; focal intracerebral hemorrhage was present in 15 (6.7%), and cerebral embolism accompanied by infarction was present in 24 (10.8%). Standard

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