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April 1954

LIVER FUNCTION AND OTHER BLOOD CHEMISTRY TESTS IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Nervous and Mental Diseases and the Department of Pathology, Northwestern University Medical School, and the Hektoen Institute for Medical Research, Cook County Hospital.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1954;71(4):405-424. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1954.02320400001001
Abstract

DEMYELINATING lesions in the central nervous system have been known to develop in the course of, and particularly in the terminal metabolic derangements of, such disorders as hepatic diseases, uremia, eclampsia, and porphyria. The development of demyelinating lesions of the central nervous system in disorders other than the nervous system has been investigated by various workers with respect to clues for the pathogenesis of the demyelinating lesions of multiple sclerosis.

The present study deals with the measurement, quantitative and qualitative, of various substances in the blood and urine often used to discover disordered liver function. Although the tests may be used as a battery to assess liver function, they are also useful in comparing the results with those in normal man and with reports of other investigators studying functions other than those of the liver. None of the patients included in this study had clinical symptoms or signs suggesting liver

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