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November 1954

CONTROL OF TWO SIMULTANEOUS VOLUNTARY MOTOR ACTS IN NORMALS AND IN PARKINSONISM

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, and the Neurological and Psychiatric Services at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1954;72(5):591-598. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1954.02330050061010
Abstract

BECAUSE of the multiple and varied aspects of Parkinsonism, the therapeutic approach has been exceedingly difficult. Most efforts have been directed toward symptomatic control of rigidity and tremor. The atropine-like drugs have been relatively successful in alleviating rigidity in patients able to tolerate adequate amounts.1 Parsidol (10-[2-diethylamino-1-propyl] phenothiazine hydrochloride)2 has been reasonably effective in some patients in reducing tremor, and by various drug combinations and the individualizing of dosages3 many Parkinsonian patients continue to lead active, useful lives.

A common complaint of the Parkinsonian patient is related, however, to fatigue and slowness in performing the chores of ordinary life. This is attributed to the interference caused by the muscle rigidity and tremor. In 50 patients with Parkinsonism, visual-motor reaction time tests have been routinely performed, and the values are close to normal in mild and moderately severe cases. In the course of observing a large number of

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