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January 1955

RESPONSE OF BLOOD EOSINOPHILES AND PLASMA 17-HYDROXYCORTICOIDS TO INSULIN SHOCK THERAPYCorrelation with Clinical Effects

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Veterans Administration Hospital, Coatesville, Pa., and the Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1955;73(1):47-56. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1955.02330070049007
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  DEEP INSULIN shock therapy for schizophrenia affords an opportunity to study the effect of repeated acute stress in humans and to correlate the measured responses with improvement or nonimprovement of the schizophrenic condition. The effects of acute stress upon certain indices of adrenocortical activity have recently been critically reviewed by Thorn, Jenkins, and Laidlaw,1 and factors controlling the concentration of blood eosinophiles, by Best and his collaborators.2 The acute fall of eosinophiles resulting from large doses of insulin or from electroshock has been frequently observed. However, the effects of repeated acute stress, such as a course of insulin shock therapy upon the eosinophile count and other more direct measurements of adrenocortical activity have not been as thoroughly studied. Furthermore, the changes in the eosinophile count occurring throughout the course of insulin shock therapy are of considerable clinical interest because of the observations of Rud,3 Altschule and associates,

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