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October 27, 1999

Lifestyle and Structured Interventions to Increase Physical Activity—Reply

Author Affiliations

Margaret A.WinkerMD, Deputy EditorIndividualAuthorPhil B.FontanarosaMD, Interim CoeditorIndividualAuthor


Copyright 1999 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.1999

JAMA. 1999;282(16):1515-1517. doi:10-1001/pubs.JAMA-ISSN-0098-7484-282-16-jbk1027

In Reply: Drs Smith and Ebrahim suggest that the conclusions in our article are not justified because there was no control group. The purpose of our study was to compare short- and long-term changes in weight and cardiovascular risk factors in patients who were randomized to a diet combined with either continuous bouts of vigorous aerobic exercise or accumulated lifestyle activity. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has recently advised that "physical activity is recommended as part of a comprehensive weight loss therapy and weight maintenance program. . . ."1 Thus, we wanted to examine whether dieting patients who were randomized to the lifestyle group would have health improvements similar to those receiving the standard of care (diet plus vigorous exercise).

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