December 28, 2011

Perceived Inappropriateness of Care in the ICUWhat to Make of the Clinician’s Perspective?

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine; Leonard Davis Institute Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics; Center for Bioethics; Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

JAMA. 2011;306(24):2725-2726. doi:10.1001/jama.2011.1897

The patient's perspective is now rightly accorded a position of great importance in determining the quality of health care delivery. In the intensive care unit (ICU), for example, clinicians are no longer interested only in ensuring that patients survive to hospital discharge or avoid ventilator-associated pneumonia, but also in achieving long-term, quality-adjusted survival1 for patients and avoiding posttraumatic stress among surrogate decision makers.2 Yet the frontline clinicians who provide critical care have rarely been considered to be relevant stakeholders in determining whether the care they deliver is consistent with the care they should deliver.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview