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Article
December 28, 1912

EFFECT ON LATER DEVELOPMENT OF SEVERE AND PROLONGED ILLNESS IN INFANCY

Author Affiliations

BIRMINGHAM, ALA.

JAMA. 1912;LIX(26):2304-2306. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270130010004
Abstract

This study was undertaken, in the absence of published data, for personal considerations of curiosity and interest, since each one of the patients has been attended through serious and prolonged illness involving inanition of decided degree. No case that did not represent extreme conditions of illness and prolonged interference with nutrition has been selected. Tables of average measurements from text-books of Holt and Koplik have been utilized for comparisons.

Case 1.  —B. S., a white boy aged 7 years 1 month; breastraised. Ileocolitis at 13 months of age; temperature 104 on first day; bloody stools at frequent intervals; hopeless prognosis given family, by consultant, on fourth day; corneal surface lesion on fourth day, attributed to intensity of infection. Illness extending over three weeks and convalescence attended by a marked degree of inanition lasting for another month.

Case 2.  —G. C., a white boy aged 6 years 1 month; breastraised. At

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