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Article
July 21, 1917

THE PHYSIOLOGIC VALUE OF THE NITROGENOUS COMPONENTS OF THE POTATO

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(3):200-201. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590300040013
Abstract

There is a widely persistent belief that protein ingested in the form of vegetable products is far less readily utilized by the human organism than are the albuminous substances of animal origin, such as are commonly consumed in flesh, fish, fowl, milk and eggs. The claim of comparatively low digestibility made against the protein of vegetable products has, indeed, furnished one of the arguments used to combat the vegetarian propaganda. In part, the statements regarding the poorer utilization of the nitrogen consumed in the form of some of the foods derived from plants are justified. Numerous experiments have demonstrated that the figures for the availability of the nitrogenous components of most common legumes and many of the coarser cereals are conspicuously lower than those for the usual mixed diet of man in which food products of animal origin enter quite largely. Atwater and Bryant1 gathered the following data:

There

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