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Article
September 22, 1917

THE PSYCHONEUROSES: HOW SHALL WE LOOK ON THEM TODAY?

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURGH

JAMA. 1917;LXIX(12):956-958. doi:10.1001/jama.1917.02590390006003
Abstract

Twenty-five years ago practically all the neuroses or psychoneuroses were classified as hysteria or neurasthenia. But for many years past there has been

a disposition to question and scrutinize these diagnoses, so that gradually the groups have grown smaller and smaller; and today these diagnoses, I suppose, are made very much less frequently than they were twenty-five years ago. This has been my own experience as regards neurasthenia, but not as regards hysteria. An examination of 1,000 cases taken from my private records, beginning in 1894, discovers that the neuroses and psychoneuroses had been classified as shown in Table 1.

Of all cases seen 23 per cent, were psychoneuroses, 17.7 per cent, were cases of neurasthenia, and 5.5 per cent, were cases of hysteria.

Comparing this list with 1,000 consecutive cases from my private records running back from December, 1916, I find diagnoses made as exhibited in Table 2.

Of

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