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Editorial
April 25, 2012

Text MessagingA New Tool for Improving Preventive Services

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Division of General Pediatrics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (Dr Szilagyi); and Division of General Pediatrics and BU-CTSI Clinical Research Informatics, Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr Adams).

JAMA. 2012;307(16):1748-1749. doi:10.1001/jama.2012.524

Prevention of influenza disease through vaccination is a public health challenge. Influenza disease causes substantial morbidity and mortality in children, adolescents, and adults; vaccination is the best method to prevent this disease. In light of the increasing understanding of the burden of influenza among children and adolescents and its spread from children to adults, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices expanded its influenza vaccination recommendations in 2008 to include all children and adolescents between 6 months and 18 years of age.1 More than 65 million children and adolescents should be vaccinated annually, usually within a short timeframe of several months when the vaccine is available. While influenza vaccination coverage nationwide has increased, it remains low—only about half of all children and adolescents are vaccinated.

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