[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.92.62. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Citations 0
Letters
January 21, 1998

Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

Author Affiliations
 

Margaret A.WinkerMD, Senior EditorIndividualAuthorPhil B.FontanarosaMD, Senior EditorIndividualAuthor

JAMA. 1998;279(3):196-197. doi:10.1001/jama.279.3.193

To the Editor.—The article by Dr Staessen and colleagues1 emphasizes the importance of considering office hypertension. Twenty-six percent of patients were able to stop taking their antihypertensive medications, and 15% of the entire group of patients who received ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring were able to avoid medication through the end of the 6-month study and maintain their daytime diastolic blood pressure below 85 mm Hg. In our patient population, we found that the prevalence of patients with normal ABP and elevated office-measured blood pressure was 34%, using 24-hour mean diastolic ABP of less than 85 mm Hg as normal.2

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×