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October 10, 1931

BLEEDING OF BENIGN ORIGIN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Medical Service of Mount Sinai Hospital.

JAMA. 1931;97(15):1058-1060. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730150014005
Abstract

Hemorrhage from an external bodily orifice is a dramatic symptom frequently of ominous portent. Acute bleeding arouses at least three grave suspicions— a blood dyscrasia, the ulceration of a malignant neoplasm or a chronic inflammatory process, particularly tuberculosis.

This report deals with a group of patients whose presenting symptom was hemorrhage but in whom serious organic disease was excluded. The diagnosis of bleeding from benign cause, furtively advanced at first, was borne out by thorough investigation and later observation in the follow-up clinic.

HEMOPTYSIS OF BENIGN ORIGIN  Hemoptysis immediately suggests tuberculosis or the ulceration of a malignant intrapulmonary neoplasm. Nevertheless, direct visualization by bronchoscopy may at times reveal that the bleeding arises from a benign source, such as a hemangioma:

REPORT OF ILLUSTRATIVE CASES 

Case 1 (courtesy of Dr. A. M. Fishberg).  —D. R., a woman, aged 39, coughed up half a glass ofblood two years ago. She was sent

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