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Article
October 17, 1931

HEAT PROSTRATION AND DEHYDRATION

Author Affiliations

Riverside, Calif.

JAMA. 1931;97(16):1169-1170. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730160051030

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Abstract

To the Editor:  —Concerning your pertinent editorial on the importance of water (The Journal, August 15, p. 465), the following case report is suggestive:W. G. F., a banker, aged 67, height 6 feet 1 inch (185 cm.), weight 207 pounds (94 Kg.), a native of Scotland, ruddy, of vigorous build, with a good family and personal history, collapsed as he was sitting in the barber's chair, August 26.Southern California was suffering a period of extremely high temperatures and a relatively low degree of humidity. The patient had come up from the beach the night before and had slept little that night on account of the heat. In the morning he drove to Hemet, approximately 40 miles, and spent several hours walking through his orange grove a number of miles in a temperature which must have approximated from 110 to 120 F. He said that he drank approximately five

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